History of Armstrong County, Pennsylvania

In placing this History of Armstrong County before their patrons, the publishers feel that the work will stand the test of candid criticism in every respect. They have spared neither endeavor nor expense which could add to its value, and to make it a volume which would reflect credit upon its author and themselves has been their aim, and therefore they rest assured that those citizens who have watched with friendly interest the progress of the work since the time it was undertaken by Mr. Smith will not be disappointed with the product of that long period of careful labor. That so voluminous a work, containing, as it does, in its eight hundred broad pages, at least six thousand dates and fifty thousand names, should be absolutely free from trivial error, thinking people will not expect; but the publishers believe that such has experienced men writers, engravers, printers and proof-readers that even inconsequential errors have been reduced to the minimum, and that essential misstatements of statement have been entirely avoided. The riches of historic lore, gathered from a thousand different sources by its author, have been returned to the patrons of the work in what has seemed the most appropriate and acceptable form; and it has been the study of the publishers, by aid of all that is most excellent in the art of typography and in the bookbinder's skill, to send the history to the people of Armstrong County clothed as its worth deserves.

 

Table of Contents

HISTORY OF ARMSTRONG COUNTY.

CHAPTER I.
History Sketch of Armstrong County... 13

CHAPTER II.
Armstrong County in the War of the Revolution... 60

CHAPTER III.
Township Division and Organization... 101

CHAPTER IV.
The Borough of Kittanning... 106

CHAPTER V.
Allegheny (Now Bethel, Parks and Gilpin)... 156

CHAPTER VI.
Kittanning... 179

CHAPTER VII.
Red Bank... 186

CHAPTER VIII.
Plum Creek... 201

CHAPTER IX.
Wayne... 214

CHAPTER X.
Kiskiminetas... 232

CHAPTER XI.
Pine (Including Boggs)... 247

CHAPTER XII.
Madison... 259

CHAPTER XIII.
Cowanshannock... 286

CHAPTER XIV.
Manor... 310

CHAPTER XV.
Mahoning... 346

CHAPTER XVI.
Burbell... 364

CHAPTER XVII.
Valley... 373

CHAPTER XVIII.
South Bend... 394

CHAPTER XIX.
Freeport... 400

CHAPTER XX.
South Buffalo... 429

CHAPTER XXI.
North Buffalo... 456

CHAPTER XXII.
West Franklin... 472

CHAPTER XXIII.
East Franklin... 496

CHAPTER XXV.
Washington... 547

CHAPTER XXVI.
Brady's Bend... 563

CHAPTER XXVII.
Perry... 571

CHAPTER XXVIII.
Hovey... 575

CHAPTER XXIX.
Parker City... 577

 

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The writer briefly refers to the person, motives and principles of the first charter proprietor of the Province of Pennsylvania, once the owner of the soil of this county. Two hundred and thirty years ago was born in the city of London the subsequent founder of that province. Hew was the son of William Penn, of the county of Wilts, Vice Admiral in the time of Cromwell, and whom King Charles II knighted for his successful naval services against the Dutch. His son our William Perm was a serious youth, lie received religious impressions in his twelfth year, which were confirmed by the preaching of Thomas Lowe, a Quaker preacher. In his fifteenth year, while a commoner in Christ Church, Oxford, he met with other students who were devoutly inclined, and with whom he joined in holding private meetings, in which they prayed and preached, which, it seems, was offensive to the college authorities, by whom those young religionists were confined for non-conformity, but continuing in their religious exercises, they were finally expelled. Young Penn's father vainly endeavored to turn him from his religious bent and exercises, which the more worldly minded senior feared would interfere with his promotion in the world, but finding him still determined to adhere to his religious convictions, gave him a severe beating and turned him adrift upon the world. The young martyr was restored to his home by the intercession of his mother. He afterward visited Paris, and after his return was admitted to the study of the law in Lincoln's Inn. He soon after became a member of the staff of the Duke of Ormond, who was then the Viceroy of Ireland. He was thus engaged for awhile in military service, of which he became fond. His father, however, would not permit him to enter the army, which he then eagerly wished to do. "It was at this interesting period of his life," says Wayne McVeagh, in his eulogy, "that the authentic portrait of him now in the possession of the Historical Society was painted a portrait which dispels many of the mis- taken opinions of his person and his character generally entertained. It presents him to us clad in armor, of frank countenance, and features delicate and beautiful, but resolute, with his hair 'long and parted in the center of his forehead, falling over his shoulders in massive, natural ringlets.' This portrait bears the date of his twenty-second birthday, and the martial motto 'Pax quaritur bello'" Having been sent, in his twenty-second year, by his father, to Ireland to manage an estate, he again met Rev. Thomas Lowe, in Cork, by whose preaching, and though his deep sympathy for a persecuted sect, he became a confirmed Quaker, and, with others, was imprisoned for attending Quaker meetings. He was, however, soon released, through the intervention of the Earl of Orrery. His father ordered him home, and finding him still inflexible in his conviction of religious duty, would have compromised with him if he would have agreed to remain uncovered before the king, the duke, and himself, which, refusing to do, he became hateful to his father, by whom he was again driven from his home, but was again restored. Though his father never afterward openly countenanced him, still he would intercede for his release when imprisoned, as he occasionally was, for conscience's sake. When Sir William died, in 1670, he was fully reconciled to his son. He left him a large estate. In bidding him farewell, he said, "Son William, let nothing in this world tempt you to wrong your conscience. So will you keep peace at home, which will be a feast to you in a day of trouble"